Seasonal City Operations

Our Operations Department is responsible for all the public works operations, including roads, sidewalks, water, sewer collection, waste water treatment, solid waste collection, electrical, fleet and equipment maintenance.  Below you will find a quick guide to what happens around the City on a seasonal basis.  

SPRING/SUMMER

 

FALL/WINTER

 

SPRING/SUMMER

 

WATER QUALITY & SPRING RUN OFF

During the “freshet” or spring run-off, the water entering the City of Kimberley’s distribution system may be cloudy or turbid. Turbidity is a measurement of water clarity and can be an indicator of a potential health risk.  The City posts the daily average turbidity reading every weekday under Water Quality/Turbidity Index.

Water levels in Mark Creek can change rapidly, and are especially high during spring run-off.   Flows are extremely fast when water levels are high and present an extreme danger to anyone falling in the creek.   Stay clear of the creek during periods of high flow.

For more information on Water Services, click HERE

City of Kimberley has the Water Shortage Response Bylaw #2527, that went into effect November 2015.

FLOODING

The Central Emergency Program and the City of Kimberley are prepared to respond in the event of flooding. Please read the following documents to find out how you can prepare and learn
what to expect in the event of a flood. 
 
For more information, click on the links below:
 

Emergency Measures for Flooding

Emergency Management BC - Community Flood Preparedness Toolkit

Spring Flooding Tips

Sandbag Tips

Detailed Drawing - Flash Board Flood Protection Barrier

Mold After Flooding

 

DEBRIS FLOW HAZARD AWARENESS

Debris flows are fast-moving mixtures of water, sediment, boulders and logs that flow down steep mountain creeks. In recent years, debris flows have caused fatalities, near misses and significant property damage in the Kootenays.

To read more on how to identify a debris flow hazard, please click HERE.

What you should do in an emergency: 
• To report a debris flow emergency that is occurring call 911. 
• To report observations of these debris indicators, call the 24-hour provincial toll-free number: 1 800 663-3456 
• Local governments are responsible for responding to emergencies in their jurisdiction. 
• The provincial government will provide technical expertise and assistance to local governments during 
emergencies. For more information, visit: www.embc.gov.bc.ca/index.htm 

 

JET RODDING

Jet rodding (or hydro jetting) cleans sewer pipes through the use of high intensity water.  It helps to cut through grease and debris and lessens the potential for sewer backups in the main lines.  City crews carry out a regular jet rodding maintenance program and use this method for clearing sewer backup problems.  City bylaws require that backflow preventers be installed in order to prevent sewer backups and any issues that may occur due to maintenance of sewer lines. A backflow preventer allows water and materials that back up to escape from the cleanout rather than flow into a home.

“Blowbacks” occur in some homes during this process.  The installation of a backwater valve (backflow prevention device) will prevent blowbacks.  A certified plumber will be able to suggest alternate solutions.

For more information on sewer backups, click HERE

 

POTHOLE REPORTING

Our crews fix potholes on a regular basis, fitting the work in between other duties.  If you have seen any big potholes, you can help out by letting us know to add them to our list.  Be sure to take note of the street address or crossroads nearest the pothole and report it to the Operations Department by emailing operations@kimberley.ca or calling 250-427-9660.

 

ODORS AND THE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT 

Have you noticed a stronger odor from the Wastewater Treatment Plant that occurs every year in June? Some of the tasks that must be done annually in June cause stronger smells from the Treatment Plant. Unfortunately, high winds and heavy rains compound the problem by carrying the odor farther as well as prolonging the natural process of drying and composting. The City does everything possible to minimize the impact and apologizes for any inconvenience.

For more information on Wastewater, click HERE

 

DUST CONTROL AND STREET SWEEPING

Once the snow has melted away, our crew begins cleaning up the gravel that was spread over streets and sidewalks.  Our street sweeper is out through the months of April and May.  We ask that residents/business owners sweep any sand and gravel from sidewalks into gutters before the streetsweeper reaches their neighbourhoods.  

SPRING RESIDENTIAL CLEANUP 

Every year in May, City crews do an additional garbage run just for yard waste.  Check here for the annual poster giving the dates and criteria for your neighbourhood's pickup.

 

INVASIVE PLANTS
 

Invasive plants are non-native species that have been introduced to an area, with the potential to cause significant negative impacts. These weeds grow and reproduce rapidly, allowing them to outcompete with native vegetation. This results in large homogeneous infestations that are not palatable to livestock or wildlife, can be expensive to control, restrict recreational access, and degrade ecosystems, among other adverse consequences.

Be aware of noxious weeds - here's how to identify them and where to report them:  Invasive Plants

 

MOSQUITO CONTROL PROGRAM

The goal of the annual nuisance mosquito control program, is to suppress local mosquito populations and reduce the potential for widespread adult mosquito annoyance for the benefit of residents and area visitors. The City has a Mosquito Surveillance and Control Program.

 
 
 

DRINKING WATER WEEK

Here in BC we often take our drinking water for granted, but it's a finite resource - there is no such thing as 'new' water! Although the expenses may not be apparent, significant costs and energy are required to treat our drinking water to be clean and safe, deliver it to our taps, and manage the wastewater that goes down the drain. The demand for water is also increasing due to population growth, industry needs and climate change.  

The City in conjunction with the BC Water & Waste Association support the Annual Drinking Water Week (usually held in May).  We invite you to celebrate this week by taking time to learn more about your water and how you can protect and conserve it.  Click HERE to visit the website.

 

PUBLIC WORKS DAY 

Our Annual Public Works Open House is usually held on the 3rd Wednesday of May.  The City offers residents a free BBQ and the opportunity to learn more about what our crews do and how they do it. Get up close and personal with the heavy equipment - loaders, boom truck, excavators and graders - and meet the Public Works Professionals who operate them.  Demonstrations, displays and lunch, too!  Contact operations@kimberley.ca for more information.

 

FALL/WINTER

 

HYDRANT FLUSHING

To ensure safe drinking water and maintain the water distribution system, the City flushes water lines in the community using City hydrants.  Residents may notice discoloration in the water while this activity is being undertaken.  The discoloration is not a public health concern.

 

SHIFT INTO WINTER - DRIVING IN WINTER CONDITIONS

Shift into Winter is a joint provincial initiative supported by organizations committed to improving the safety of drivers during the winter months.    Every day thousands of BC drivers and workers are at risk of being injured or killed while on the road. The risk increases significantly when winter weather makes roads more hazardous due to fog, rain, snow and ice. 

If you can, wait until the weather improves before getting in your car.  If you have to drive, drive smart.  The best way to stay safe on the roads in winter is to avoid driving when road and weather conditions are bad. Even an hour or two can make a big difference. Make sure your vehicle is winter ready, give yourself lots of extra time to get where you need to go and carry an emergency survival kit.

A few moments thinking about it now could save you problems when you are behind the wheel.  Click on these links for more tips:

Drive for the Conditions

Prepare Yourself for Winter Conditions

 

PREVENTING FROZEN WATER SERVICE LINES

If the water service line to your home has ever frozen or you have noticed a reduced water flow in your home during the winter, leave one tap running cold water day and night (stream should be the size of a pencil). This will help to prevent your lines from freezing.  Since frost sinks deeper into the ground when air temperatures rise after a period of extreme cold, you will need to keep the water running 24/7 until mid-April to avoid having the line freeze.  

The City encourages residents who have experienced frozen water service lines in the past to be pro-active by ensuring indoor lines are properly insulated, keeping a good snow cover over the ground above the service lines and installing a bleeder line system.

 

For more information, click HERE
For other suggestions from Columbia Basin WaterSmart, click HERE
For an option that doesn't require leaving water running, click HERE